Customer Helpline (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket

Choose a FREE print if you spend over £220!
See Choice of Free Prints


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985


Valuations

Classified Ads Terms and Conditions Shipping Info Contact Details

Aircraft
Search
Ship
Search
Squadron
Search
Signature
Index
Artist
Index
Product Search         
(Exact match search - please check our other menus first)
CLICK HERE FOR A FULL LIST OF ALL ROBERT TAYLOR PRINTS BY TITLE

Coming Home by Tim Fisher.


Coming Home by Tim Fisher.

The B-17 Flying Fortress 'Memphis Belle' returns from one of her 25 mission over France and Germany. Memphis Belle, a B-17F-10-BO, USAAF Serial No.41-24485, was supplied to the USAAF on July 15th 1942, and delivered to the 91st Bomb Group in September 1942 at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine. Memphis Belle deployed to Scotland at Prestwick on September 30th 1942 and went to RAF Kimbolton on October 1st, and then to her permanent base at Bassingbourn on October 14th.1942. Memphis Belle was the first United States Army Air Force heavy bomber to complete 25 combat missions with her crew intact. The aircraft and crew then returned to the United States to promote and sell war bonds. The Memphis Belle B-17 is undergoing extensive restoration at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.
Item Code : DHM1283Coming Home by Tim Fisher. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf
Price!
Now : £50.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT DOUBLE PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.
for £125 -
Save £75

Buy With :
Defenders of the Reich by Graeme Lothian.
for £135 -
Save £115

Buy With :
Berlin Bound by Anthony Saunders.
for £100 -
Save £50
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR TRADE DISCOUNT MULTI-PRINT PACKS - AVAILABLE DIRECT TO OUR CUSTOMERS AT THESE PRICES!
American Flying Fortress Aviation Print Pack.

Pack price : £270 - Save £195

        
Buy With :
3 other prints in this pack :
CLICK HERE TO VIEW OR PURCHASE

Pack price : £270 - Save £195

Titles in this pack :
Coming Home by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
The Veteran by Simon Smith.  (View This Item)
Last One Home by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling



Other editions of this item : Coming Home by Tim Fisher DHM1283
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf Price!Now : £70.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTMorgan Presentation Edition of 5 prints, supplied double mounted. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm) Morgan, Bob
+ Artist : Tim Fisher


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£260.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£110 Off!Now : £480.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Tim Fisher. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£1900.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (One print reduced to clear)

Ex display in near perfect coondition with minor handling dent on image.
Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£70 Off!Now : £30.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Coming Home by Tim Fisher.
About all editions :

Detailed Images :



The 25 missions of Memphis Belle
November 7, 1942 - Brest, France
November 9, 1942 - St Nazaire, France
November 17, 1942 - St. Nazaire, France
December 6, 1942 - Lille, France
December 20, 1942 - Romilly-sur-Seine
December 30, 1942 - Lorient (Piloted by Lt. James A. Verinis)
January 3, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
January 13, 1943 - Lille, France
January 23, 1943 - Lorient, France
February 14, 1943 - Hamm, Germany
February 16, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
February 27, 1943 - Brest, France
March 6, 1943 - Lorient, France
March 12, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 13, 1943 - Abbeville, France
March 22, 1943 - Wilhemshaven, Germany
March 28, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 31, 1943 - Rotterdam, Holland
April 16, 1943 - Lorient, France
April 17, 1943 - Bremen, Germany
May 1, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
May 13, 1943 - Meaulte, France (Piloted by Lt. C.L. Anderson)
May 14, 1943 - Kiel, Germany (Piloted by Lt. John H. Miller)
May 15, 1943 - Wilhelmshaven, Germany
May 17, 1943 - Lorient, France
May 19, 1943 - Kiel (flown by Lt. Anderson)

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

This Week's Half Price Art

Depicting Dauntless and Devastator attacking the Japanese aircraft carrier Akagi during the Battle of Midway.

Midway - The Setting Sun by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £55.00
 Dedicated to those who served and died in the Battle of Britain on the ground and in the air during the summer of 1940.

A Nation Alone by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00
 Mystery still surrounds just why Manfred von Richthofen risked so much in chasing the novice pilot Wilfred Wop May into Allied-occupied territory on the morning of Sunday, 21st April 1918, but it was to be his last flight, this error of judgement costing him his life. Von Richthofen had broken from the main fight involving Sopwith Camels of 209 Sqn to chase Mays aircraft, but found himself under attack from the Camel of Captain Roy Brown. All three aircraft turned and weaved low along the Somme River, the all red Triplane coming under intense fire from the ground as well as from Browns aircraft. No one knows exactly who fired the crucial bullet, but Manfred von Richthofens aircraft was seen to dive suddenly and impact with the ground. The Red Baron was dead and his amazing run of 80 victories was over. The painting shows Mays aircraft (D3326) in the extreme distance, pursued by DR.1 (425/17) and Browns Camel (B7270) in the foreground.

Captain Roy Brown engages the Red Baron, 21st April 1918 by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 Spitfire of 610 Squadron which has been damaged during combat during the height of the Battle of Britain is shown over the white cliffs of Dover.  No. 610 (County of Chester) Squadron of the Royal Auxiliary Air Force's first major combat with the Luftwaffe was on 27th May when a Heinkel bomber protected by about 40 Me110s, was engaged.  The combat which followed saw the Heinkel and three Me110 fighters being shot down.  Throughout August 610 Squadron was involved in bitter fighting over the Channel and Home Counties of England.  During the Battle of Britain No.610 Squadron operated from Biggin Hill, Hawkinge, and, on one occasion, from Croydon.  The Squadron put up a terrific show and 40 enemy aircraft were confirmed as having been destroyed by 610 Squadron during August.  The loss to the Squadron was eleven pilots killed during the battle.

Return of the Heroes by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00

Depicting two B17s from 92nd bomb group having joined a lone B24 from 93rd. In the background, the distinctive triangles on the tails of the two aircraft denote membership to the 303rd BG.

Motley Crew by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - £35.00
Lancaster CF-X (LM384) of 625 Squadron.  On the Leipzig raid on the evening of 19th/20th February 1944 approx 47 Lancasters were shot down or failed to return, that is over 300 airmen.  Lancaster CF-X (LM384) was taking part in the bombing raids that were a build up to the D-Day landings of June 1944.  Leipzig was seen as a high value target due to its oil and synthetic fuel production.  The Lancaster took off from Kelstern in Lincolnshire just before midnight.  Unfortunately LM384 did not come back as was the case with many others - the aircraft was lost and crashed just outside the tiny village of Bledeln in Germany.  The Pastor of the village, Herr Duncker, kept a diary throughout the war and has an account of the plane crash and the subsequent burial of the crew.  All of the crew died in the crash except one - bomb aimer George Paterson who was interned in Stalag 357 Kopernikus.  The rest of the crew were given a Christian burial and stayed there until the end of the war, when the war graves commission disinterred the crew and reburied them in the Hannover war cemetery.

Last Long Shadow by Anthony Saunders (AP)
Half Price! - £60.00
 Two Spitfire Mk1Bs of 92 Squadron patrol the south coast from their temporary base at Ford, here passing over the Needles rocks, Isle of Wight, in the Spring of 1942.

In Them We Trust by Ivan Berryman. (J)
Half Price! - £105.00
The scene depicts an encounter between Manfred Von Richthoffen, leader of the Jasta II squadron and a patrol of Sopwith Camels. This particular battle above France took place only weeks before Richthoffen was killed as can be seen from the Balken Kreuz insignia which replaced the iron cross on German aircraft after a directive dated March 1918.

Manfred Von Richthoffen (The Red Baron) by Tim Fisher.
Half Price! - £20.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

DH007. Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
Half Price! - £12.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
 Ralf Schumacher winning the first Grand Prix of his career in the Williams FW23. Ralf dominated the San Marino Grand Prix from the first corner to the chequered flag giving Williams its first win since 1997. History was made when the Schumachers became the first brothers in Formula 1 to win a Grand Prix. Imola April 2001.

The Italian Job by Michael Thompson
Half Price! - £75.00
 It was Saturday 4th May 2002, the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.  Wonderful goals by Ray Parlour and Freddie Ljungberg for Arsenal were too much for their London rivals Chelsea to capture the FA Cup.  Four days later, on Wednesday 8th, Arsenal rode into Old Trafford.  This time a goal by Sylvain Wiltord on his 100th appearance for the club was enough for Arsene Wenger's team to overcome Manchester United and clinch the Premiership title, maintaining a record of scoring in every league game of the season.  For the second time in four years under their long-serving and inspirational captain Tony Adams, Arsenal had performed the classic double of English football, the third in their history making 2001-02, a season never to be forgotten.

The Double 2001 / 2002 by Gary Keane. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

 A Provisional IRA bomb left outside the Unionist Party Headquarters, exploded prematurely injuring several police, army and civilians. At the same time it devastated the recently repaired Grand Opera House and Europa Hotel.

Business as Usual, Glengall St, Belfast, December 1991 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £40.00
French Dragoons charge a Prussian position during the Franco Prussian war.
The Charge by Alphonse de Neuville.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Although outnumbered ten to one, General Arthur Wellesley defeated the well trained Mahratta army in one of the fiercest battles in India. It was the first of many victories by the future Duke of Wellington, and the bloodiest for the number, he recalled, that I ever saw.

The 74th Highlanders at the Battle of Assaye, 23rd September 1803 by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
 General Major Erwin Rommel leads the vanguard of his vaunted 7th Panzer (Ghost) Division past an abandoned French Char B tank on its epic drive from the Ardennes to the English Channel.

Blitzkrieg, Northern France, May 1940 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £50.00

 

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:



Subscribe to our newsletterReturn to Front Page