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Coming Home by Tim Fisher.


Coming Home by Tim Fisher.

The B-17 Flying Fortress 'Memphis Belle' returns from one of her 25 mission over France and Germany. Memphis Belle, a B-17F-10-BO, USAAF Serial No.41-24485, was supplied to the USAAF on July 15th 1942, and delivered to the 91st Bomb Group in September 1942 at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine. Memphis Belle deployed to Scotland at Prestwick on September 30th 1942 and went to RAF Kimbolton on October 1st, and then to her permanent base at Bassingbourn on October 14th.1942. Memphis Belle was the first United States Army Air Force heavy bomber to complete 25 combat missions with her crew intact. The aircraft and crew then returned to the United States to promote and sell war bonds. The Memphis Belle B-17 is undergoing extensive restoration at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.
Item Code : DHM1283Coming Home by Tim Fisher. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf
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American Flying Fortress Aviation Print Pack.

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Titles in this pack :
Coming Home by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
The Veteran by Simon Smith.  (View This Item)
Last One Home by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Coming Home by Tim Fisher DHM1283
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf Price!Now : £70.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTMorgan Presentation Edition of 5 prints, supplied double mounted. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm) Morgan, Bob
+ Artist : Tim Fisher


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£260.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£110 Off!Now : £480.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Tim Fisher. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£1900.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Coming Home by Tim Fisher.
About all editions :

Detailed Images :



The 25 missions of Memphis Belle
November 7, 1942 - Brest, France
November 9, 1942 - St Nazaire, France
November 17, 1942 - St. Nazaire, France
December 6, 1942 - Lille, France
December 20, 1942 - Romilly-sur-Seine
December 30, 1942 - Lorient (Piloted by Lt. James A. Verinis)
January 3, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
January 13, 1943 - Lille, France
January 23, 1943 - Lorient, France
February 14, 1943 - Hamm, Germany
February 16, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
February 27, 1943 - Brest, France
March 6, 1943 - Lorient, France
March 12, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 13, 1943 - Abbeville, France
March 22, 1943 - Wilhemshaven, Germany
March 28, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 31, 1943 - Rotterdam, Holland
April 16, 1943 - Lorient, France
April 17, 1943 - Bremen, Germany
May 1, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
May 13, 1943 - Meaulte, France (Piloted by Lt. C.L. Anderson)
May 14, 1943 - Kiel, Germany (Piloted by Lt. John H. Miller)
May 15, 1943 - Wilhelmshaven, Germany
May 17, 1943 - Lorient, France
May 19, 1943 - Kiel (flown by Lt. Anderson)

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

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