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Coming Home by Tim Fisher.


Coming Home by Tim Fisher.

The B-17 Flying Fortress 'Memphis Belle' returns from one of her 25 mission over France and Germany. Memphis Belle, a B-17F-10-BO, USAAF Serial No.41-24485, was supplied to the USAAF on July 15th 1942, and delivered to the 91st Bomb Group in September 1942 at Dow Field, Bangor, Maine. Memphis Belle deployed to Scotland at Prestwick on September 30th 1942 and went to RAF Kimbolton on October 1st, and then to her permanent base at Bassingbourn on October 14th.1942. Memphis Belle was the first United States Army Air Force heavy bomber to complete 25 combat missions with her crew intact. The aircraft and crew then returned to the United States to promote and sell war bonds. The Memphis Belle B-17 is undergoing extensive restoration at the National Museum of the United States Air Force at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio.
Item Code : DHM1283Coming Home by Tim Fisher. - This Edition
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PRINT Signed limited edition of 1150 prints.

Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf
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Titles in this pack :
Coming Home by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
Scheherazade by Tim Fisher.  (View This Item)
The Veteran by Simon Smith.  (View This Item)
Last One Home by Ivan Berryman.  (View This Item)

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Other editions of this item : Coming Home by Tim Fisher DHM1283
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ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 50 artist proofs. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim FisherHalf Price!Now : £70.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTMorgan Presentation Edition of 5 prints, supplied double mounted. Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm) Morgan, Bob
+ Artist : Tim Fisher


Signature(s) value alone : £40
£260.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£110 Off!Now : £480.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 50 giclee canvas prints. Image size 30 inches x 20 inches (76cm x 51cm)Artist : Tim Fisher
on separate certificate
£90 Off!Now : £370.00VIEW EDITION...
ORIGINAL
PAINTING
Original painting by Tim Fisher. Image size 36 inches x 24 inches (91cm x 61cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£500 Off!Now : £1900.00VIEW EDITION...
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Signed limited edition of 1150 prints. (One print reduced to clear)

Ex display in near perfect coondition with minor handling dent on image.
Image size 24 inches x 15 inches (61cm x 38cm)Artist : Tim Fisher£50 Off!Now : £50.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Coming Home by Tim Fisher.
About all editions :

Detailed Images :



The 25 missions of Memphis Belle
November 7, 1942 - Brest, France
November 9, 1942 - St Nazaire, France
November 17, 1942 - St. Nazaire, France
December 6, 1942 - Lille, France
December 20, 1942 - Romilly-sur-Seine
December 30, 1942 - Lorient (Piloted by Lt. James A. Verinis)
January 3, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
January 13, 1943 - Lille, France
January 23, 1943 - Lorient, France
February 14, 1943 - Hamm, Germany
February 16, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
February 27, 1943 - Brest, France
March 6, 1943 - Lorient, France
March 12, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 13, 1943 - Abbeville, France
March 22, 1943 - Wilhemshaven, Germany
March 28, 1943 - Rouen, France
March 31, 1943 - Rotterdam, Holland
April 16, 1943 - Lorient, France
April 17, 1943 - Bremen, Germany
May 1, 1943 - St. Nazaire, France
May 13, 1943 - Meaulte, France (Piloted by Lt. C.L. Anderson)
May 14, 1943 - Kiel, Germany (Piloted by Lt. John H. Miller)
May 15, 1943 - Wilhelmshaven, Germany
May 17, 1943 - Lorient, France
May 19, 1943 - Kiel (flown by Lt. Anderson)

The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Flying FortressIn the mid-1930s engineers at Boeing suggested the possibility of designing a modern long-range monoplane bomber to the U.S. Army Air Corps. In 1934 the USAAC issued Circular 35-26 that outlined specifications for a new bomber that was to have a minimum payload of 2000 pounds, a cruising speed in excess of 200-MPH, and a range of at least 2000 miles. Boeing produced a prototype at its own expense, the model 299, which first flew in July of 1935. The 299 was a long-range bomber based largely on the Model 247 airliner. The Model 299 had several advanced features including an all-metal wing, an enclosed cockpit, retractable landing gear, a fully enclosed bomb bay with electrically operated doors, and cowled engines. With gun blisters glistening everywhere, a newsman covering the unveiling coined the term Flying Fortress to describe the new aircraft. After a few initial test flights the 299 flew off to Wright Field setting a speed record with an average speed of 232-mph. At Wright Field the 299 bettered its competition in almost all respects. However, an unfortunate crash of the prototype in October of 1935 resulted in the Army awarding its primary production contract to Douglas Aircraft for its DB-1 (B-18.) The Army did order 13 test models of the 299 in January 1936, and designated the new plane the Y1B-17. Early work on the B-17 was plagued by many difficulties, including the crash of the first Y1B-17 on its third flight, and nearly bankrupted the Company. Minor quantities of the B-17B, B-17C, and B-17D variants were built, and about 100 of these aircraft were in service at the time Pearl Harbor was attacked. In fact a number of unarmed B-17s flew into the War at the time of the Japanese attack. The German Blitzkrieg in Europe resulted in accelerated aircraft production in America. The B-17E was the first truly heavily armed variant and made its initial flight in September of 1941. B-17Es cost $298,000 each and more than 500 were delivered. The B-17F and B-17G were the truly mass-produced wartime versions of the Flying Fortress. More than 3,400 B-17Fs and more than 8,600 B-17Gs would be produced. The American daylight strategic bombing campaign against Germany was a major factor in the Allies winning the War in Europe. This campaign was largely flown by B-17 Flying Fortresses (12,677 built) and B-24 Liberators (18,188 built.) The B-17 bases were closer to London than those of the B-24, so B-17s received a disproportionate share of wartime publicity. The first mission in Europe with the B-17 was an Eighth Air Force flight of 12 B-17Es on August 12, 1942. Thousands more missions, with as many as 1000 aircraft on a single mission would follow over the next 2 ½ years, virtually decimating all German war making facilities and plants. The B-17 could take a lot of damage and keep on flying, and it was loved by the crews for bringing them home despite extensive battle damage. Following WW II, B-17s would see some action in Korea, and in the 1948 Israel War. There are only 14 flyable B-17s in operation today and a total of 43 complete airframes

This Week's Half Price Art

During the early 1930s, Imperial Airways of London introduced to its European and Eastern routes the HP42, an enormous four-engined Handley Page biplane carrying up to 38 passengers at a sedate 100mph.  For the first time air travellers could enjoy Pullman comfort, the wicker-work chairs finally being dispensed with.  Eight of these outstanding aircraft were built and operated from 1931 to the start of the Second World War.  The European services were flown by the four known as the Heracles class with fleet names Horatius, Hengist and Helena.  The Hannibal class with Horsa, Hanno and Hadrian serviced the Empire routes.  They accumulated over 10 million miles of peacetime operations wthout harm to a single passenger or crew member.  Safety became their byword. Depicted here is Horatius, bound for Paris from Croydon.  What a sight to behold, truly a galleon of the clouds.
Croydon Departure by Gerald Coulson.
Half Price! - £40.00
 This was the moment when the massive Möhne dam was finally breached on the night of 16th-17th May 1943 during the top secret Operation Chastise. The specially-converted Lancaster B MkIII of Fl/Lt David Maltby ED906(G) AJ-J roars between the towers of the dam, having released the Upkeep bouncing bomb that would ultimately cause a cascade of water to flood into the valley below. Fl/Lt Harold Martin's identical aircraft, ED909(G) AJ-P can be seen off Maltby's port wing with all of its light ablaze, drawing enemy fire from the attacking bomber.

Dambusters - Moment of Truth by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - £300.00
 In the early evening of the 18th of July 1941, following coastguard reports of an enemy aircraft in their vicinity, two Hurricanes of 87 Sqn  on detachment at the Airfield at St Mary's, Scilly Isles were scrambled  to an area some 30 miles south west of the Scilly Isles where they intercepted a lone Heinkel He111.  Alex Thom was the first to attack, his windscreen being sprayed with oil as his rounds tore into the Heinkel's starboard engine.  Breaking away, his wingman F/O Roscoe now took over the chase, but the German bomber was already mortally wounded and was observed to alight onto the sea where upon the crew immediately took to their life raft as the Heinkel began to sink beneath the waves just minutes later, Thom circled overhead until he saw the motor launch arrive to pick up the German aircrew before returning back to St Mary's.

An Early Bath by Ivan Berryman. (B)
Half Price! - £65.00
The military trained many of their first world war pilots on the Jenny.  Several thousand Jennies were produced and after the war many of these aircraft were purchased by some of the 20,000 airmen which left the armed services after world war one, paying a fraction of the cost for these aircraft.  Barnstorming began.  These pilots would make a living from Barnstorming across the US, giving rides to civilians for as much at 15 to 20 dollars a trip.  This was a time when most people had not seen an aircraft let alone go up in one.  Barnstorming gradually became saturated with pilots and aircraft and over a short peiod of time the prices paid for a trip in a Jenny went down toas low as 2 to 3 dollars, and making a living became hard for the pilots who could hardly pay for the fuel and living costs let alone aircraft maintenance.  There were a number of fatal accidents, but Barnstorming played a vital role in aviation and probably put the idea of becoming a pilot in the minds of many young boys who would later go on to fly in combat during world war two.

Balmy Days by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £50.00

 Resplendent in the striking new red and yellow corporate livery, Boeing 757 SF freighter OO-DPJ, the first to bear the new colours, lifts off from Brussels National Airport, DHL's European hub.

The Power to Deliver by Robert Tomlin. (Y)
Half Price! - £30.00
 A C130 Hercules MK1 from RAF Lynham Transport Wing, delivers a low level Brigade drop of Airbourne forces over Salisbury Plain.

Dawn Descent by David Pentland. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
DHM924.  Jaguar Flight Test On by Geoff Lea.

Jaguar Flight Test On by Geoff Lea.
Half Price! - £23.00
 No one will ever know exactly what caused Max Immelmanns demise, but what is known is that his propeller was seen to disintegrate, which caused a series violent oscillations that ripped the Fokker E.III apart, the tail breaking away before the wings folded back, trapping the young German ace in his cockpit. The popular belief is that his interrupter gear malfunctioned, causing him to shoot away part of his own propeller, but British reports attribute Immelmanns loss to the gunnery of Cpl J H Waller from the nose of FE.2b 6346 flown by 2Lt G R McCubbin on Sunday, 18th June 1916. Immelmann was flying the spare E.III 246/16 as his own E.IV had been badly shot up earlier that day.

Immelmanns Last Flight by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £40.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

Race horses gallop to the finish shown in this racing painting by Mark Churms.

The Finish by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Valentino Rossi at speed on his Repsol Honda.
Rossi at Speed by Derrick Mark.
Half Price! - £25.00


Lester Piggott by Gary Keane. (Y)
Half Price! - £45.00
 Marlboro McLaren Mercedes MP4/11. 1996.
David Coulthard by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

 Musa Qala, Afghanistan, 25th May 2008.  While returning to Sangin following an operation in support of 2 PARA battlegroup, the Vikings of 3rd Troop, Armoured Support Company, Royal Marines were the target of an enemy ambush. As the convoy began to cross the Helmand river the waiting Taliban engaged the convoy with RPGs, heavy machine gun and sniper fire. Amazingly despite this hail of fire no one was hit until tragically Marine Dale Gostick was killed and two others injured when his vehicle was blown up by a massive IED.

Crossing the Helmand by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
 Depicting French Cuirassiers capturing a Russian Standard.
A Cavalry Skirmish by Theodore Gericault.
Half Price! - £25.00
 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, July 2009.  Troops of the 2nd Mercian Regiment 19th Light Brigade engaged on compound searches during Operation Panchai Palang.

Green Zone Patrol by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £70.00
 On the night of 6th April 1812 Wellingtons Army, surrounding the walled Spanish town of Badajoz (garrisoned by Napoleons soldiers under general Baron Philippon) is ready to attack! The men of the 45th regiment from Pictons 3rd Division launch themselves in a desperate and bloody assault against the north castle wall. Carrying improvised ladders, the men have their top buttons undone, overalls rolled up and are stripped for action. The castles defenders (Germans, allied to Napoleon of the Graf und Erbprinz Regiment from Hesse-Darmstadt) partroling the walls in their greatcoats are intially surprised by the bold assault from this sector but they have been preparing the strong defenses for some time. Soon the night air is full of musketry, falling masonry, burning bundles of ropes and exploding grenades or mines. Despite the horrific casualties suffered the attackers press home. As the first scaling ladders are raised near a small bell tower the young Lt. James Macpherson reaches for the top of the wall. The ladders are too short! Undaunted he cries to his men below to lift the base of the ladder closer to the wall. This rapid, vertical movement suddenly propels him to a height several feet above the Germans heads. A shot rings out as one of the defenders fires point blank into the young mans chest. Fortunately the lead ball only strikes a glancing blow, cleaving in two a button of the officers waist coat and dislocating one of his ribs. Despite his fortunate escape, the force of the impact nearly sends him tumbling from the ladder. Somehow he maintains his grasp but the ladder itself gives way under the weight of the men following. Some unfortunates are impaled on the bayonets of their comrades below. Leaping from the rungs of another ladder, Corporal Kelly is the first man over the top and gradually the 45th gain a foothold on the ramparts. The rest of the regiment is ordered to unfix bayonets. Using the few remaining ladders, others also manage to scale the walls. Through the carnage they climb, club and shoot their way into the castle itself! Maepherson now regains consciousness at the foot of the wall and revived with a cup of coco from his friend A.A. General Hercules Packenham, who was directly behind him on the ladder when it broke. Though winded by the shot he rises to his feet. This sudden movement relocates his rib and he is able to climb the ladders once more. Once over the defense he sees the old towers of Apendez and Albar-rana to his left and the cathedral illuminated by gun fire in the distance. However his objective is directly ahead. Atop the abandoned tower of Santa Maria before him still flies the French tricolour. Macplierson seizes the opportunity, mounts the spiral stairway to the top turret and pulls down the enemy flag. For want of a substitute he flies his own red jacket from the pole, signifying that the castle has fallen. In the rest of the town the fighting continues and turns into a blood lust. Badajoz is one of the bloodiest and violent sieges of the Peninsula War. On the following day Maepherson presents his trophy to the Duke of Wellington himself but his bravery is not rewarded with a promotion.

Badajoz by Mark Churms. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00

 

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