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Duel by Ivan Berryman. (P)


Duel by Ivan Berryman. (P)

With the Battle of Britain at its height and the RAF stretched to breaking point, September of 1940 was a desperate time for the young pilots who fought gallantly to defend the UK against an imminent invasion. Among those brave few was the eighteen year old Geoffrey Wellum, shown here destroying a Heinkel He.111 on 11th September in Spitfire 1a K9998. The Heinkel fought back, peppering Wellum's Spitfire with holes, but the German bomber was mortally wounded and was seen to go down in flames.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : B0441PDuel by Ivan Berryman. (P) - This Edition
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ORIGINAL
ACRYLIC
Original acrylic painting by Ivan Berryman.

Size 13 inches x 9 inches (33cm x 23cm) Wellum, Geoffrey
+ Artist : Ivan Berryman


Signature(s) value alone : £35
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Other editions of this item : Duel by Ivan Berryman.B0441
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 30 giclee art prints. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£30 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £60.00VIEW EDITION...
ARTIST
PROOF
Limited edition of 20 artist proofs. Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)Artist : Ivan BerrymanAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£105.00VIEW EDITION...
PRINTPresentation edition of 2 prints Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 21cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman£300.00VIEW EDITION...
GICLEE
CANVAS
Limited edition of 10 giclee canvas prints. Size 16 inches x 10 inches (41cm x 25cm)Artist : Ivan Berryman
on separate certificate
£30 Off!Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Now : £220.00VIEW EDITION...
Extra Details : Duel by Ivan Berryman. (P)
About all editions :

Detail Sections



The Aircraft :
NameInfo
SpitfireRoyal Air Force fighter aircraft, maximum speed for mark I Supermarine Spitfire, 362mph up to The Seafire 47 with a top speed of 452mph. maximum ceiling for Mk I 34,000feet up to 44,500 for the mark XIV. Maximum range for MK I 575 miles . up to 1475 miles for the Seafire 47. Armament for the various Marks of Spitfire. for MK I, and II . eight fixed .303 browning Machine guns, for MKs V-IX and XVI two 20mm Hispano cannons and four .303 browning machine guns. and on later Marks, six to eight Rockets under the wings or a maximum bomb load of 1,000 lbs. Designed by R J Mitchell, The proto type Spitfire first flew on the 5th March 1936. and entered service with the Royal Air Force in August 1938, with 19 squadron based and RAF Duxford. by the outbreak of World war two, there were twelve squadrons with a total of 187 spitfires, with another 83 in store. Between 1939 and 1945, a large variety of modifications and developments produced a variety of MK,s from I to XVI. The mark II came into service in late 1940, and in March 1941, the Mk,V came into service. To counter the Improvements in fighters of the Luftwaffe especially the FW190, the MK,XII was introduced with its Griffin engine. The Fleet Air Arm used the Mk,I and II and were named Seafires. By the end of production in 1948 a total of 20,351 spitfires had been made and 2408 Seafires. The most produced variant was the Spitfire Mark V, with a total of 6479 spitfires produced. The Royal Air Force kept Spitfires in front line use until April 1954.

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