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With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.


With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.

Passing the stand in the Galway Plate.
Item Code : SFA0021With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 195 prints.

Image size 18 inches x 13.5 inches (46cm x 34cm)Artist : Chris HowellsHalf
Price!

Supplied with one or more free  art prints!
Now : £70.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : The Finish by Mark Churms.

This complimentary art print worth £40
(Size : 11 inches x 8 inches (28cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


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Rooster Booster by Chris Howells.
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Chris Howells Horse Racing Print Pack.

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3 other prints in this pack :
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Titles in this pack :
Chasing for Gold by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)
Over The Last by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)
Rooster Booster by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)
With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)

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This Week's Half Price Art

 The Minstrel, 1977, Shergar, 1981, Golden Fleece, 1982, .Teenoso, 1983, Reference Point, 1987, Nashwan, 1989.

Derby Winners by Peter Deighan.
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Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
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 Ferrari F310.  1996.
Eddie Irvine by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - £25.00
 It was Saturday 4th May 2002, the Millennium Stadium in Cardiff.  Wonderful goals by Ray Parlour and Freddie Ljungberg for Arsenal were too much for their London rivals Chelsea to capture the FA Cup.  Four days later, on Wednesday 8th, Arsenal rode into Old Trafford.  This time a goal by Sylvain Wiltord on his 100th appearance for the club was enough for Arsene Wenger's team to overcome Manchester United and clinch the Premiership title, maintaining a record of scoring in every league game of the season.  For the second time in four years under their long-serving and inspirational captain Tony Adams, Arsenal had performed the classic double of English football, the third in their history making 2001-02, a season never to be forgotten.

The Double 2001 / 2002 by Gary Keane. (Y)
Half Price! - £65.00

 The English football team for 2002.
England by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £50.00
In the final moments of extra time of the game, the England number 10, Jonny Wilkinson slotted a perfect drop goal which clinched victory over Australia, winning 20 points to 17.†

Rugby World Cup Final 2003 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £50.00
David Coulthard made his Grand Prix debut at the Spanish Grand Prix in 1994.  Only an electrical problem with his Williams Renault stopped Coulthard finishing 3rd in his first ever Grand Prix.  This performance was enough to confirm his potential and earn a drive for the 1995 season.  Winning at Estoril, on the podium at Interlagos, Magny-Cours, Silverstone, Hockenheim, Hungaroring and T I Aida, placed him third in the championship in his first full Grand Prix season.  Coulthard moved to McLaren for the 1996 season proving on many occasions that he could match the pace of team leader Mika Hakkinen, who has a reputation as one of the fastest.  For 1997, Coulthard took over the mantle of Britains No.1 driver and was well qualified to do so.  Winning at Melbourne and Monza, second at A1 Ring and Jerez.  Fourth in the championship prior to Schumachers exclusion.  Coulthard drives with a balance of flair and aggression which earned him considerable respect.  After nearly fifteen years as a top flight driver, Coulthard has now retired from driving, leaving a remarkable legacy behind him.  Twice winner of the British Grand Prix in 1999 and 2000, he has represented Scotland and Great Britain at the highest level of motorsport for well over a decade.

Tribute to David Coulthard by Stuart McIntyre
Half Price! - £23.00
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Half Price! - £25.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

 Sturmgeschutz IIIg and Paratroops of the 4th Fallschirmjager Division, driving to the front line, pass one of the two giant 28cm K5 (Eisenbaum) railway guns responsible for the shelling the Allied beacheads at Anzio and Nettuno.

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Half Price! - £250.00
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This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

 After service in the 96th Infantry Regiment, Smirnov joined the XIX Corps Air Squadron in 1914, shooting down twelve enemy aircraft in the course of two years. When revolution swept through Russia in November 1917, he escaped the Bolsheviks via a White counter-revolutionary route, eventually joining the RAF in England, serving at the Central Flying School at Upavon. He is shown here in his silver Nieuport 17, having just despatched a Roland C.II.

Captain Ivan Smirnov†by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £40.00
 During a patrol on 6th July 1918, Christiansen spotted a British submarine on the surface of the Thames Estuary. He immediately turned and put his Hansa-Brandenburg W.29 floatplane into an attacking dive, raking the submarine C.25 with machine gun fire, killing the captain and five other crewmen. This victory was added to his personal tally, bringing his score to 13 kills by the end of the war, even though the submarine managed to limp back to safety. Christiansen survived the war and went on to work as a pilot for the Dornier company, notably flying the giant Dornier Do.X on its inaugural flight to New York in 1930. He died in 1972, aged 93.

Kapitanleutnant zur See Friedrich Christiansen by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £37.50
 For Manfred von Richthofen, the air battle in the skies west of Amiens on 20th April 1918 was to yield a final two victories to add to the seventy eight with which he was already credited.  But these were to be his last, the Red Baron finally succumbing the following day.  Just moments before Second Lieutenant David Lewis' 3 Sqn Sopwith Camel fell to the German's guns (the young pilot surviving to tell his story of being the Red Baron's final victim), Major Richard Raymond-Barker was not so lucky, his aircraft burning furiously until it hit the ground in a fireball near the Forest of Hamel.

The 79th Victory by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £650.00
 Portsmouth August 26th 1940, the lone spitfire of Squadron Leader Sandy Johnstone breaks the ranks and picks off one of the menacing Heinkels only to encounter an equally determined attack from a BF109. <br><br>We were brought to readiness in the middle of lunch and scrambled to intercept mixed bag of 100+ Heinkel IIIs and DO 17s approaching Portsmouth from the South.  The controller did a first class job and positioned us one thousand feet above the target. with the sun  behind us, allowing us to spot the raiders from a long way off. No escorting Messchersmitts were in sight at the time, although a sizable force was to turn up soon after. then something strange happened.  I was about to give a ticking off to our chaps for misusing the R/T when I realised I was listening to German voices. It appeared we were both using the same frequency and, although having no knowledge of the language it sounded from the monotonous flow of the conversation that they were unaware of our presence. as soon  as we dived towards the leading formation, however we were assailed immediately to loud shouts of  Achtung Spitfuern Spitfuern! as our bullets began to take their toll.  In spite of having taken jerry by surprise our bag was only six, with others claimed as damaged, before the remainder dived for cloud cover and turned for home. In the meantime the escorting fighters were amongst us when two of our fellows were badly shot up. Hector Maclean stopped a cannon shell on his cockpit, blowing his foot off above the ankle although, in spite of his grave injuries, he managed to fly his spitfire back to Tangmere to land with wheels retracted. Cyril Babbages aircraft was also badly damaged in the action. forcing him to abandon it and take to his parachute. He was ultimately picked up by a rescue launch and put ashore at Bognor, having suffered only minor injuries.  I personally accounted for one Heinkel III in the action (Sandy Johnson) . <br><br>No. 602 City of Glasgow auxiliary squadron was a household name long before WWII began. It had been the first auxiliary squadron to get into the air in 1925, two of its members, Lord Clydeside and David McIntyre  were the first to conquer Mount Everest in 1933, the squadron sweeped the board in gunnery and bombing in 1935, beating the regular squadrons at their own game. It was the first auxiliary Squadron to be equipped with Spitfire Fighters as far back as March 1939 and it was the first squadron to shoot down the first enemy aircraft on British soil.  The squadron moved south from Drem airfield in East Lothian on August 14th 1940 to relieve the already battered no. 145 squadron at Westhampnett, Tangmeres satelitte station in Sussex. The squadron suffered 5 casualties during the battle. The squadron remained at Westhampnett until December 1940 to be replaced by no. 610 auxiliary airforce squadron. No 602 squadron itself remained active up until 1957 when it was put into mothballs.

Gauntlet by Anthony Saunders (P)
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