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With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.


With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.

Passing the stand in the Galway Plate.
Item Code : SFA0021With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells. - This EditionAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout! Buy 1 Get 1 Half Price!
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTLimited edition of 195 prints.

Image size 18 inches x 13.5 inches (46cm x 34cm)Artist : Chris Howells30 Off!
Supplied with one or more free  art prints!
Now : 110.00

Quantity:
EXCLUSIVE website offer from Cranston Fine Arts - FREE art print(s) supplied with the above item!


Exclusive Offer for Online Orders Only

FREE PRINT : The Finish by Mark Churms.

This complimentary art print worth 40
(Size : 11 inches x 8 inches (28cm x 20cm))
has been specially chosen by Cranston Fine Arts to complement the above edition, and will be sent FREE with your order.

This item can be viewed or purchased separately in our shop, HERE


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Rooster Booster by Chris Howells.
for 115 -
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Chris Howells Horse Racing Print Pack.

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Titles in this pack :
Chasing for Gold by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)
Over The Last by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)
Rooster Booster by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)
With a Circuit To Go by Chris Howells.  (View This Item)

All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


This Week's Half Price Art

 Ayrton Senna corners hard to the right in his Honda McLaren.

Senna Number One by Ivan Berryman. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 Valentino Rossi.  Honda RC211V
Master on Two Wheels by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 28.00
 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the three-quarters stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - 75.00
 David Coulthard. McLaren Mercedes MP4/13
A Scottish Gentleman by Michael Thompson.
Half Price! - 25.00

SPC5003. Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.

Rory Underwood by Rodger Towers.
Half Price! - 60.00
DH007. Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
Steady Johnnie Steady by Erskine Nicol.
Half Price! - 12.00
MC0042P. Tomahawk by Mark Churms.

Tomahawk by Mark Churms. (P)
Half Price! - 1200.00


Lester Piggott by Gary Keane. (Y)
Half Price! - 65.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

 Australian VC winner-Private Albert Jacka, 14th battalion.  He killed nine Turks who had bombed and infiltrated an Australian trench at Courtneys post during the great Turkish assault on 19th May.

Gallipoli - Courtneys Trench by Jason Askew. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
In 1857, during the Indian Mutiny, the 5th (Northumberland) (Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot was part of Major-General James Outram's little force which fought its way to Cawnpore, where the haggard remnants of Major-General Sir Henry Havelock's regiments had been besieged by the mutineers.  Then together, their combined force marched on 21st September, in a deluge of rain, to attempt the relief of Lucknow.  They fought their way across a flooded landscape towards the Alam Bagh, the Prince of Oudh's garden palace, where 12,000 of the enemy barred the way, with their cannon commanding the road.  The Alam Bagh was a very large enclosure, with a wall all around it.  At each of the four corners of the wall was a two-storeyed tower.  There was a gateway in the centre of each side of the wall.  In the centre of the enclosure was a palace, the Bara Dari.  On 23rd September, the British force advanced and drove the sepoys from their position.  The 5th Regiment, on the right, with the 78th Highlanders cleared the enemy from the Alam Bagh, and the British entered the enclosure.  All night it rained.  For three days Havelock's men had marched and fought in a downpour, and on the 24th he let them rest.  A reconnoitring party, under Lieutenant Brown, went forward from the Alam Bagh in skirmishing order, till they came under a heavy fire.  The sepoys closed in on the little party, as the British withdrew in good order.  Private E. Deveney had his leg carried away by a cannon-ball.  Brown ran back to him, followed by Corporal Grant.  Under a heavy fire they brought him safely to the Alam Bagh.  For this deed Corporal Grant was later awarded the Victoria Cross.  Next morning was dull and grey, the country a sea of mud.  Leaving 6 officers and 300 men at the Alam Bagh, the little British force advanced the last few miles to fight its way through the streets against tremendous odds, and into the besieged Residency at Lucknow.  The 5th Fusiliers were wearing white smock frocks and trousers.  White covers and neck curtains were also made for their forage caps, to which were affixed peaks removed from their unused shakos.  They were armed with the new Enfield rifles.  Officers in this campaign dressed how they pleased, and I have depicted Lieut. Brown wearing his red shell jacket.  In the background is the Alambagh.
Corporal Robert Grant VC and Lt Brown, 5th (Northumberland) Fusiliers Saving Pte Deveney, Returning Towards the Alambach, Lucknow after a reconnaissance 25th Sept. 1857 by David Rowlands. (GS)
Half Price! - 200.00
A Tiger I and PAK 40 anti tank gun of the Muncheberg Division, field a final defence of the capital in front of the Brandenburg Gate under the shattered remains of the famous Linden trees. The under-strength division had just been formed the previous month from a mixture of ad hoc units and various marks of tank. Despite this it put up a spirited fight until its final destruction in early May.

Tiger at the Gate, Berlin, 30th April 1945 by David Pentland. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 The Old Guard being asked to surrender at the end of the Battle of Waterloo.
The Last Stand of the Old Guard by Robert Hillingford. (Y)
Half Price! - 20.00

This Week's Half Price Aviation Art

Depicting Spitfires of No.229 squadron as they pass over Malta in 1942, a tribute to the young pilots, regarded as the saviour of an Island.

Maltese Falcons by Anthony Saunders (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00
 The distinctive blue and red livery of these two Albatros D.Vs identify them as Jasta 18 machines in Berthold Colours, a reference to their commander at that time, Oblt Rudolf Berthold. The nearest aircraft is that of Leutnant der Reserve Paul Strahle who scored six victories with this unit before taking his aircraft (4594/17) with him to Jasta 57 where he would score a further 8. Each aircraft carried a personal emblem, in the case of Strahle a white axe whilst the similar aircraft of Ltn d R Arthur Rahn displays a diamond pattern. The fuselage crosses on both aircraft were crudely painted over and are still just visible beneath the blue.

Leutnant d R Paul Strahle by Ivan Berryman. (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 USS Coral Sea (CV-43 being replenished by fast combat support ship USS Seattle (DE-3) as two of the carriers compliment of F.4s of VF-111 The Sundowners makes a low pass.

USS Coral Sea by Ivan Berryman (GL)
Half Price! - 300.00
 Avro Lancaster AJ-P of Flt. Lt. Martin 617 Squadron releases the bomb that successfully breaches the Mohne dam. In the foreground the electrical substation is burning from a previous attack by Flt.Lt. Hopgood.

GONER 58A - Mohne Dam, Germany, 17th May 1943 by David Pentland. (GS)
Half Price! - 250.00

 

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