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Zero Encounter by Robert Taylor.


Zero Encounter by Robert Taylor.

A Japanese Zero condenses the air off its wing tips as its pilot hauls his fighter inside a Marine F4F Wildcats determined attack. The two adversaries cavort the air in a desperate duel high over the island of Guadalcanal. The sky is alive with fighting aircraft as F4Fs and Zeros are locked in deadly combat. Below, clearly visible throught the clear tropical air is the prize over which they do battle: A single tiny airstrip on a small hill, humid, almost uninhabitable island - A priceless possession providing the key to air supremacy in the South Pacific.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : AX0036Zero Encounter by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1250 prints.

SOLD OUT (£460, January 2009)
Paper size 34 inches x 26 inches (86cm x 66cm) Ishikawa, Shiro
Foss, Joseph J
Sakai, Saburo
Carl, Marion
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £235
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Zero
WildcatF4F

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