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Zero Encounter by Robert Taylor.


Zero Encounter by Robert Taylor.

A Japanese Zero condenses the air off its wing tips as its pilot hauls his fighter inside a Marine F4F Wildcats determined attack. The two adversaries cavort the air in a desperate duel high over the island of Guadalcanal. The sky is alive with fighting aircraft as F4Fs and Zeros are locked in deadly combat. Below, clearly visible throught the clear tropical air is the prize over which they do battle: A single tiny airstrip on a small hill, humid, almost uninhabitable island - A priceless possession providing the key to air supremacy in the South Pacific.
AMAZING VALUE! - The value of the signatures on this item is in excess of the price of the print itself!
Item Code : AX0036Zero Encounter by Robert Taylor. - This Edition
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Signed limited edition of 1250 prints.

SOLD OUT (£460, January 2009)
Paper size 34 inches x 26 inches (86cm x 66cm) Ishikawa, Shiro
Foss, Joseph J
Sakai, Saburo
Carl, Marion
+ Artist : Robert Taylor


Signature(s) value alone : £235
SOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
All prices on our website are displayed in British Pounds Sterling


The Aircraft :
NameInfo
Zero
WildcatF4F

This Week's Half Price Art

 Boeing Chinook of No.7 Squadron (detachment) from RAF Aldergrove, flying on supply duty in the west of the province.

Chinook over the Sperrins by David Pentland. (AP)
Half Price! - £45.00
 Fw190A-4/U8 night bomber variant of SKG.10.

Focke Wulf Fw190A-4/U8 by Ivan Berryman.
Half Price! - £70.00
 A sight never to be repeated. Concorde G-BOAE gracefully drifts above London with Buckingham Palace immediately below, Westminster Abbey, the Houses of Parliament, the River Thames and the London Eye in the middle distance. On 24th October 2003, the world said goodbye to this elegant airliner, bringing to a close almost thirty years of commercial supersonic travel.

Concorde over London by Ivan Berryman. (Y)
Half Price! - £50.00
The leading ace of the mighty Eighth Air Force, Gabby Gabreski. He finished the war with a total of 28 air victories and 2 1/2 enemy aircraft destroyed on the ground by strafing airfields. Gabreski also scored 6 1/2 air victories in the Korean war.

Return From Bremen by Simon Smith.
Half Price! - £70.00

P40 Kittyhawks of No.3 Squadron RAAF based at Ta Qali Airfield, Malta.

Over Grand Harbour by Anthony Saunders.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Lockheed Vega PV-1 VB32 Squadron in the Santaren Channel. From this point on the U-boat was hunted and harassed only to be sunk in the Bay of Biscay.

The Hunt for U-Boat 134 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £35.00
 When the RAF took delivery of their first Consolidated B.24 Liberators in 1941, aerial cover for trans-Atlantic convoys was strengthened, affording these brave merchant ships a modicum of protection as they forged their slow passage from the US to Britain with vital supplies. 120 Sqn was immediately pressed into this role from their initial base at Nutts Corner in Northern Ireland, before moving to Ballykelly and Reykjavik in Iceland as the U-Boat threat increased. The example shown is a Liberator V of RAF Coastal Command.

The Long Patrol by Ivan Berryman. (P)
Half Price! - £550.00
Douglas C47 Dakotas fly into the landing and drop zone at Renkum Heath, September 17th 1944.

Arnhem by Simon Smith (D)
Half Price! - £20.00

This Week's Half Price Sport Art

 The Intercontinental Formula was first organised by British Racing Drivers Club to allow the racing of cars with 2000cc to 3000cc engines. At the time the 1500cc limit of Formula 1 had been instituted by the international ruling body in the belief that the smaller cars would mean safer racing. In reality this meant that the relatively easy to handle Formula 1 cars could be driven by less experienced drivers almost as fast as the most experienced master drivers. The result was that the car with fractionally more power was the deciding factor in winning the race, rather than the better driver but this also compromised track safety. The introduction of the Intercontinental Formula was seen as more of a challenge for the drivers, with the larger and more powerful cars requiring greater skill and experience than to drive the 1500cc cars of Formula 1. The 13th International Trophy on Saturday 6th May 1961 was the first race of the season to carry World Championship points and consisted of 80 laps of Silverstone, a total of 233 miles. Stirling Moss, having already won the International Sports Car Race in a Lotus earlier that day, was driving Rob Walkers 2.5 litre Cooper Climax and qualified 2nd on the grid despite being unhappy with the steering of his car. The starting grid front row was Bruce McLaren, Stirling Moss, Jack Brabham and Graham Hill and by the time the race started at 2.30pm a heavy rain meant that the track was not only soaked but also covered in oil and rubber from the previous races. World Champion Jack Brabham made a superb start, passed Moss and was first into Copse and by lap 4 Moss was in 3rd place led by Surtees and Brabham. Due to appalling conditions and poor visibility many of the cars were spinning or leaving the track and by lap 13 Brabham and Moss were 1st and 2nd with the rest of the field some distance behind. Moss now poured on the pressure and for the next few laps he tried to pass as he harried Brabham in a duel for the lead. The pair were now beginning to lap the tailenders and, at around a quarter of the distance Moss was held up by Flockhart, Brabhams team member, who had allowed Brabham to pass. Moss gestured angrily to Flockhart as he was unable to follow Brabham and, as the rain paused for a while the pace became faster. Suddenly and quite dramatically Moss passed both Flockhart and Brabham and within 2 laps had gained 5 seconds on the World Champion. As the rain returned in a deluge Moss mercilessly pushed on, increasing his lead to 1.5 minutes by the halfway mark. Although he could have taken things easily at this point Moss drove on relentlessly at a seemingly impossible pace and was now lapping most of the field for a second time. By the ¾ stage he completed his humiliation of Brabham by passing him for a second time to lap him representing a 3 mile lead. Moss eventually won the race in 2hrs 41 mins 19.2 secs, 1.5 laps ahead of Brabham and at least two laps ahead of the rest of the field in what were treacherous conditions. At the end of the race Moss summed up the experience as a nice ride, having proved himself to be one of the greatest and fastest drivers in the world under any conditions. Sir Stirling Moss believes this to be one of his finest ever drives.

A Moment of Triumph by Gerald Coulson. (Y)
Half Price! - £75.00
Race horses gallop to the finish shown in this racing painting by Mark Churms.

The Finish by Mark Churms.
Half Price! - £20.00
 Jim Clark in his Lotus-Ford 38 winning in the record breaking 1965 Indianapolis 500 Mile Classic.

Jim Clark by Ray Goldsbrough.
Half Price! - £75.00
PDB3.  Lenox Lewis II by Peter Deighan.
Lenox Lewis II by Peter Deighan.
Half Price! - £41.00

This Week's Half Price Military Art

 After almost two months of continuous fighting in the front line, remnants of the 12th SS Panzer Division, Hitler Jugend, fall back under incessant air attacks by allied fighter bombers for their final battles in France. In their defense of the northern flank of what is to become the Falaise Gap the new Jagdpanzer IV in particular is to prove a formidable foe to the attacking British and Canadian tanks.

The Falaise Gap, Normandy, 12th - 20th August 1944 by David Pentland.
Half Price! - £100.00
 Battle of Hydaspes. Porus had a very large army which included 200 war elephants. The battle saw a charge by the elephants, against the Macedonian forces, which began to look successful. Seeing this, Porus Cavalry charged, against Alexanders cavalry (in this period it was very unusual to have cavalry contact) The elephant charge began to falter and the battle edged towards victory for Alexander. Due to his admiration of Porus as a leader, Alexander granted him honourable terms and built an alliance with him. His army was not so fortunate, with 3,000 cavalry lost and 20,000 infantry killed.

Defeat of Porus by Alexander the Great 326BC by Francois Louis Joseph Watteau. (Y)
Half Price! - £25.00
<b>Ex-display prints in near perfect condition. </b>

Lance-Corporal Harry Nichols, 3rd battalion Grenadier Guards, winning the Victoria Cross at the River Escaut, 21st May 1940 by David Rowlands. (Y)
Half Price! - £20.00
Military art print of the Franco-Prussian war showing French Infantry defenders at the fortifications of Champigny.
The Defence of Champigny, November 30th 1870 by Edouard Detaille.
Half Price! - £20.00

 

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